It’s Hegel’s 250th birthday—here’s to reason in history and notoriously difficult German philosophers in the news.   (Deutsche Welle, 8/27/20; The Guardian, 8/27/20)

The Bohemians by Norman Ohler, translated by Tim Mohr and Marshall Yarbrough, is “a detailed and meticulously researched tale about a pair of young German resisters that reads like a thriller.”  (The New York Times, 7/14/20; The Spectator, 8/6/20)

A bestselling book about Angela Merkel’s response to the European refugee crisis (Die Getriebenen) has since inspired a popular TV movie. “Any attempt to understand the legacy of the summer of 2015 must reckon with both works—and the crucial differences between them.”  (Foreign Policy, 8/23/20)

Suzanne L. Marchand “uses porcelain as a vehicle to weave a sweeping economic, social and cultural history of central Europe. Along the way, she traces the transformation of the hundreds of German principalities into a powerful state that, by the late 19th century, was producing porcelain on an industrial scale.”  (The Economist, 7/16/20; The Wall Street Journal, 7/28/20)

“‘Michael Kohlhaas,’ which was recently reissued by New Directions in a sparkling new translation from Michael Hofmann, makes for a fine entry point into Kleist’s passionate, grotesque, hysterical, and deeply strange body of work.”  (The New Yorker, 5/20/20)

Reality TV meets the refugee crisis: “The first thing to say about Timur Vermes’s second novel, The Hungry and the Fat, is that Jamie Bulloch’s translation is immaculate . . . The second striking thing about this novel is how very good it is.”  (The Guardian, 2/8/20; Financial Times, 2/14/20)

“The Habsburgs are a writer’s gift, offering a regal cast of mad, colourful and deeply flawed characters.” In a new book, Martyn Rady charts the rise and fall of one of history’s most powerful families.  (Financial Times, 5/20/20; TLS, 6/26/20)

James Kirchick recalls The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum by Nobel prizewinner Heinrich Böll, and shows us how “a biting Cold War-era German novella helps explain our current moment.”  (The American Interest, 6/28/20)

“Christine Wunnicke’s glittering, absurdist jewel of a novel,” The Fox and Dr. Shimamura, is “itself a translation from the German.” And a prizewinning one at that! Philip Boehm is the 2020 recipient of the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize.  (Music & Literature, 3/28/19; The New York Times, 5/31/19)

“The zoos were microcosms of postwar Germany, subsumed, like everything else during the Cold War, into the ideological struggle.” The Zookeepers’ War by J. W. Mohnhaupt, translated by Shelley Frisch, is the cultural history of Cold War Berlin you didn’t know you were missing.   (Time, 11/12/19; Air Mail, 11/23/19)

Daniel Kehlmann’s new novel Tyll, translated by Ross Benjamin, reanimates “the old German chronicle of mobile mischief by placing its protagonist, Tyll Ulenspiegel, in a deeply imagined early-seventeenth-century world, a Europe ruined by the Thirty Years’ War.” (The New York Times, 2/3/20; The New Yorker, 2/10/20)

“In the nineteen-forties, the West Side of Los Angeles effectively became the capital of German literature in exile. It was as if the cafés of Berlin, Munich, and Vienna had disgorged their clientele onto Sunset Boulevard.”  (The New Yorker, 3/2/20)

Sinclair McKay has written a new history of the firebombing of Dresden on February 13, 1945.  (The Spectator, 2/1/20; The Economist, 2/6/20)

An “entirely unimportant young lady alone with her questions” becomes an interpreter at the Frankfurt Auschwitz trials in The German House by Annette Hess, translated into English by Elisabeth Lauffer.  (The Washington Post, 12/30/19; The Economist, 1/8/20)

Donna Rifkind shines an overdue spotlight on Salka Viertel, “a destroyer of walls, a builder of bridges, a welcome among strangers,” in a new biography, The Sun and Her Stars.  (Harper’s, 1/2020; Time,  1/2/20)

Donna Rifkind shines an overdue spotlight on Salka Viertel, “a destroyer of walls, a builder of bridges, a welcome among strangers,” in a new biography, The Sun and Her Stars.  (Harper’s, 1/2020; Time,  1/2/20)

How to build a multicultural and pluralistic Germany?  Max Czollek provocatively tells the country’s minorities to “de-integrate” themselves.  (The New York Times, 1/16/20)

Haven’t made it through Robert Musil’s The Man without Qualities? Try Agathe, or the Forgotten Sister, in a new translation by Joel Agee. Its 36 chapters are “a novel within the novel,” zeroing in on the unusual love story between Ulrich and Agathe.  (The New York Times, 12/5/19; The Paris Review, 1/8/20)