kulturplease.com

What's New          Music          Art & Design          Books & Ideas          Film         

Theater        History        Et Cetera        Archive        About 
 

    

Links
American Institute for Contemporary German Studies

Deutsche Kultur International

Deutsche Welle

Eurozine

German Historical Institute - London

German Historical Institute - Washington DC

German History in Documents and Images

German Life

Goethe-Institut

H-German

The Local

New Books in German

Spiegel Online - International


German Links
art-in.de

Deutsches Historisches Museum

Frankfurter Allgemeine

filmportal.de

literaturhaus.net

Literaturportal

MIZ

Perlentaucher

Projekt Gutenberg

Spiegel Online

ddeutsche.de

Zeit Online

The Painter Otto Dix and his Wife Martha  











The Painter Otto Dix and His Wife Martha, photo by August Sander (1925–26)


                  What's New
"The German novels to be excited about right now have no comedy moustaches and no young men wearing horn-rimmed spectacles. Instead, they're experimental and full of empathy."  (The Skinny, 9/18/17) Rüdiger Safranski's Goethe: Life as a Work of Art, translated by David Dollenmayer, "is aimed squarely at a German readership of Bildungsbürger, educated and tolerant of abstractions and paraphrases."  (The Washington Post, 5/17/17; Literary Review, 6/2017; The New York Times, 6/6/17; The Economist, 6/15/17) In Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919-1933, Tate Liverpool gives us the brilliant pairing of August Sander and Otto Dix, delivering "an evocation of a time and place that will stop you in your tracks."  (The Telegraph, 6/23/17; The Observer, 6/25/17; The Quietus, 7/2/17)


                  Election 2017
"Perhaps it's a useful dose of realism: As it turns out, Germany is not so exceptional after all."  (Slate, 9/24/17; The Washington Post, 9/24/17; The Economist, 9/25/17; Spiegel Online - International, 9/25/17) Oh, how I love German election posters!  (Deutsche Welle, 8/9/17; The Awl, 9/7/17; Buzzfeed, 9/20/17) "Raw emotion, anger, last-minute legal skirmishes, plenty of controversy and a highly uncertain outcome"—the Tegel airport referendum has everything the general election lacks.  (Financial Times, 9/21/17)


                   Music
"In 1960, four years after the venerable Blue Note Records signed pianist Jutta Hipp, she stopped performing entirely." Here's a look back at the too-short career of Europe's "First Lady of Jazz."  (Longreads, 8/4/17) The world's most powerful leaders just attended a performance of Beethoven's Ninth. How well did they listen?  (Los Angeles Times, 7/8/17; The New York Times, 7/9/17; The New Yorker, 7/12/17) Beginning in September 1965, Beat Club brought the youth rock revolution to German television viewers. (Open Culture, 5/25/17)


                  Art & Design
There's billowing smoke, horizontal piping, and an impressive Parthenon of banned books at Kassel's Documenta 14.  (Apollo, 6/19/17; The New York Times, 6/23/17; Deutsche Welle, 7/28/17) In Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919-1933, Tate Liverpool gives us the brilliant pairing of August Sander and Otto Dix, delivering "an evocation of a time and place that will stop you in your tracks."  (The Telegraph, 6/23/17; The Observer, 6/25/17; The Quietus, 7/2/17) Don't worry about Betroffenheitskitsch, and take another look at the work of Käthe Kollwitz.  (artnet, 7/18/17)


                  Books & Ideas
"The German novels to be excited about right now have no comedy moustaches and no young men wearing horn-rimmed spectacles. Instead, they're experimental and full of empathy."  (The Skinny, 9/18/17) Rüdiger Safranski's Goethe: Life as a Work of Art, translated by David Dollenmayer, "is aimed squarely at a German readership of Bildungsbürger, educated and tolerant of abstractions and paraphrases."  (The Washington Post, 5/17/17; Literary Review, 6/2017; The New York Times, 6/6/17; The Economist, 6/15/17) "Can German philosophy be consumed at a common, everyday level without being dumbed down or having its ideas stripped of their complexity?"  (Foreign Policy, 7/24/17)


                  Film
On August 25, 1967, Willy Brandt introduced West Germans to color TV.  (Deutsche Welle, 8/25/17)  In Cate Shortland's new thriller, Berlin Syndrome, handsome German stranger meets cute with Australian tourist—and then he imprisons her.  (The Guardian, 4/19/17; The New York Times, 5/25/17) If I Think of Germany at Night, a new documentary by Romuald Karmukar, is an intimate portrait of techno DJs at work. (The Hollywood Reporter, 2/14/17; The Economist, 5/22/17)


                  Theater
"What does a dance company do when its sole choreographer and leader, a figure as charismatic and intense as Pina Bausch, dies, leaving her dancers without a clear path forward?" It keeps performing, of course.  (The New York Times, 9/12/17; The New York Times, 9/12/17; The New York Times, 9/15/17) The Berlin Staatsoper is reopening after a seven-year renovation.  (The New York Times, 9/3/17) Berlin's Volksbühne has a new artistic director (farewell, Frank Castorf)—but Chris Dercon is unlikely to get a standing ovation from the local theater community anytime soon.  (dispositio, 5/20/17; Deutsche Welle, 5/17/17; Financial Times, 5/26/17; The New York Times, 9/12/17)


                  History
"Reconciling the confusing, often paradoxical origins of Protestantism in Luther and his successors seems like a good project for a half-millennium retrospective." (The Nation, 7/12/17) "Countries without Holocausts on their history books can also learn from Germany's grown-up, vigilant and dutiful culture of remembrance."  (The Economist, 8/13/17; NPR, 8/16/17; Politico, 8/20/17) A glass of block-ade, anyone? In January 1949, the American Women's Club of Berlin published a cheerful cookbook called Operation Vittles.  (Slate, 8/4/17)


                  Et Cetera
The Germans have helpful experience in dealing with neo-Nazis, too.  (The New York Times, 8/17/17; The Conversation, 8/21/17; The New York Times, 8/23/17) "Vorsprung durch Cheating"? It seems that Daimler, BMW, Audi, Porsche, and Volkswagen have been secretly coordinated technical standards, pricing, and other matters for years.  (Politico, 7/25/17; Spiegel Online - International, 7/27/17; Financial Times, 8/1/17) Yes, there is a German Spelling Council, and it gets to create new letters and tell us how to use them. SCHEIẞE!  (The Awl, 7/5/17; The Local, 7/11/17; Quartz, 7/20/17)