kulturplease.com

What's New          Music          Art & Design          Books & Ideas          Film         

Theater        History        Et Cetera        Archive        About 
 

    

Links
American Institute for Contemporary German Studies

Deutsche Kultur International

Deutsche Welle

Eurozine

German Historical Institute - London

German Historical Institute - Washington DC

German History in Documents and Images

German Life

Goethe-Institut

H-German

The Local

New Books in German

Spiegel Online - International


German Links
art-in.de

Deutsches Historisches Museum

Frankfurter Allgemeine

filmportal.de

literaturhaus.net

Literaturportal

MIZ

Perlentaucher

Projekt Gutenberg

Spiegel Online

ddeutsche.de

Zeit Online

ImEx









"ImEx – Impressionism and Expressionism, Art at a Turning Point"
Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin















                  What's New
"With gaudy costumes and 80s-style dance routines, Helene Fischer has become one of the most successful German artists of all time—and polarized the country."  (Deutsche Welle, 7/3/15) New on DVD: vintage Cold War dramas from 1962/63, produced on opposite sides of the Berlin Wall.  (The New York Times, 6/26/15) Now at the Alte Nationalgalerie in Berlin, through September 20: "the first time Impressionists and Expressionists have been exhibited side by side in a big show," revealing surprising similarities and shared influences.  (The New York Times, 5/26/15; The Economist, 5/28/15)


                  Germany, global leader?
"Today, German barely exists outside Europe’s 100-million-person Germansphere. It’s almost nobody’s second language...Perversely, while the German language has been shedding global status, Germany has only gained it."  (Financial Times, 6/19/15) "Europe can’t look to Germany for long-term leadership," writes Jochen Bittner, "at least not now. Germany can only provide interim stability; it cannot resolve the dizzying chaos itself."  (The New York Times, 6/16/15) "Germany has thus largely succeeded in boosting its international image as a benign and competent country," writes Parke Nicholson, "but it is difficult to see how its soft power has led to actual outcomes."  (Foreign Affairs, 6/1/15)


                   Music
"With gaudy costumes and 80s-style dance routines, Helene Fischer has become one of the most successful German artists of all time—and polarized the country."  (Deutsche Welle, 7/3/15) Who will succeed Simon Rattle as chief conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra in 2018? Kirill Petrenko! (The New York Times, 5/6/15; The New York Times, 5/11/15; Deutsche Welle, 5/12/15; The New Yorker, 5/13/15; Deutsche Welle, 6/22/15; The New York Times, 6/22/15; The Spectator, 6/23/15) After 265 years, Elias Gottlob Haussmann's renowned portrait of J.S. Bach has come back to Leipzig.  (The Guardian, 4/29/15; Deutsche Welle, 6/15/15)


                  Art & Design
All 619 photographic prints from August Sander's "People of the Twentieth Century" are coming to the Museum of Modern Art.  (The New York Times, 6/4/15; The Guardian, 6/18/15) Radically modern architectural designs of the 1960s! See them now through October 26, at the Berlinische Galerie.  (Deutsche Welle, 6/24/15) German police have seized prominent Nazi artworks that were missing for decades, including the horses that once stood in front of Hitler's Chancellery. Now, what to do with them?  (Deutsche Welle, 5/22/15; Spiegel Online - International, 5/26/15; The New York Times, 6/9/15; The New York Times, 6/25/15)


                  Books & Ideas
Looking for "abstruse gastroenterological research" turned into "breezy, entertaining prose"? Giulia Enders has written the book for you!  (The New York Times, 6/19/15) Jenny Erpenbeck, winner of the 2015 Independent foreign fiction prize, "talks about pretending to be a teen, life in the GDR and the what-ifs in women’s lives."  (The Guardian, 6/6/15) Franz Kafka wrote The Metamorphosis one century ago. "Numerous translations have re-shaped it into English, but which is the most successful?"  (The Guardian, 5/13/15)


                  Film
New on DVD: vintage Cold War dramas from 1962/63, produced on opposite sides of the Berlin Wall.  (The New York Times, 6/26/15) "You are up against something more than tourist scenery. You are up against German history. It isn't good."  (Open Culture, 6/29/15) Do we really need a reboot of Das Boot, Wolfgang Petersen's 1981 classic?  (The Guardian, 6/25/15) 


                  Theater
"It’s that time of year again: the balmy nights of late spring are the augurs of the annual ritual of blood-letting in northern Bavaria, when the remaining Wagners do their best to tear each other apart in public on the eve of the Bayreuth festival."  (The Guardian, 6/11/15; Slipped Disc, 6/12/15) Q: What do you get when Robert Wilson and Herbert Grönemeyer stage Faust at the Berliner Ensemble?  A: "A frenetic fever dream, a funhouse rock opera that’s more Rocky Horror than reverent recapitulation of Goethe’s tragic masterpiece, with a Mephistopheles who’s beyond irresistible."  (Exberliner, 5/5/15; Deutsche Welle, 5/30/15) "A graphic story that kicks off with sex, progresses to a full-blown orgy and then torture, and ends with a gruesome mass slaughter replete with horrifying detail"—I'm guessing Die 120 Tage von Sodom won't be heading to Broadway anytime soon.  (Deutsche Welle, 5/28/15)


                  History
Germany is still waiting for full marriage equality. Explore the past 150 years of gay history, politics, and culture in a new exhibition at the German Historical Museum.  (AP, 6/24/15; Deutsche Welle, 6/26/15) Should the United States approach the Confederate flag like the swastika in the Federal Republic of Germany?  (The Washington Post, 6/24/15) "In her relatively short life, of only 48 years, she saw, delved, experienced, felt, and roused more than most people with much longer life spans." Axel Fair-Schulz reconsiders Rosa Luxemburg for the 21st century.  (Logos, Winter 2015)


                  Et Cetera
"The paternoster is the VW-beetle of elevators. Not many people use it, but many love it.” (Notes of Nomads, 3/7/14; The Washington Post, 6/1/15; The Wall Street Journal, 6/25/15) "Today, German barely exists outside Europe’s 100-million-person Germansphere. It’s almost nobody’s second language...Perversely, while the German language has been shedding global status, Germany has only gained it."  (Financial Times, 6/19/15) Gluckschmerz (Glückschmerz?): it's not a German word yet, but it ought to be.  (The Wall Street Journal, 6/12/15)